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Friday, December 25, 2009

MERRY CHRISTMAS to ALL



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Merry Christmas!

WHAT DOES CHRISTMAS MEAN TO ME?
Family, friends, church, good company, food, Prime Rib, Presents!

What's In A Name (Isaiah 9:2-7)

"his name will be Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace"

CHRISTMAS

What's in the name?

Christ part of Christmas is the Christ who came to save the world
The "M" is Man. He was Christ the man among us. He came as a man
The "A" is Among us. He lived among us
The "S" is Savior of the world
The "mas" is Mass or Mass of people coming together to worship.
thus CHRISTMAS





Tuesday, December 22, 2009

Advent Calendar - Day 22



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Advent Calendar Day 22 Christmas and Deceased Relatives


Did your family visit the cemetery at Christmas?

Yes we visited the Cemetery in December. It usually started out  every September where we put a Fall grave blanket on Grandma and Grandpa Fermazin’s graves in Lincoln Memorial Park,  Aurora, Illinois.  Every Fall my parents and my dad’s sister Lola bought a grave cover to be placed over the graves. In December a wreath was ordered and placed on the headstones. Even after we moved to California, my parents always ordered the grave blankets and wreaths.
Nowadays, my cousin, Karen and I carry on the tradition. I send the money to her in Illinois and she buys the grave blankets for our grandparents and has them placed on the graves.  We still do a wreath in December to carry on the tradition.
Now we just have more to remember.  Our grandparents and our parents.  I carry on the tradition in California, by placing a wreath on the headstones of my parents who are buried in California.

What are grave blankets?

Grave blankets are headstone coverings that are placed on the graves during cold weather winter months. You order them at the cemetery and they will usually place them. We always got a Fall theme and at Christmas we put a wreath on the headstone.


How did your family honor deceased family members at Christmas?

We sit around the Christmas Dinner table talking about oma and opa and recalling family memories of mom and dad and Christmas’ past.



* This post is part of the Advent Calendar of Christmas memories carnival by Thomas MacEntee at http://www.geneabloggers.com/preview-advent-calendar-christmas-memories/
You can go to geneabloggers.com to read the suggestions for each days Advent Calendar





Saturday, December 19, 2009

Catherina POTT and Mathias LINDEN



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GREAT GRANDPARENTS
LUXEMBOURGERS

Catherina (Katie) POTT was born on 2 March 1853 in Lipperscheid, Luxembourg. She was the daughter of Jean POTT and Susanne BIEVER of Michelau, Luxembourg. Katie and her brother, Nicholas POTT immigrated to the United States. We have not found the ship or immigration records at Castle Gardens or in Filby’s Germans to America. We think they arrived about 1871. They settled in Aurora, Illinois a Luxembourger community. Nicholas POTT was born 30 AUG 1857 in Flebour, Michelau, Luxemburg. He was married to Annie (Klein) WILLIAMSON b: 1862 in Aurora, Kane, Illinois on 11 April 1883. Nicholas POTT and his family later moved to Iowa.

Mathias LINDEN was born 27 March 1854 in Waldbillig, Luxembourg, the youngest child of Maria Margaretha WAGENER and Theodor Dietrich LINDEN. He immigrated to the United States in 1871 at the age of 14 with his father, Theodor Dietrich LINDEN and his brother, Pierre Peter LINDEN on the ship R.M.S. Abyssinia which left Liverpool July 17th . The ship manifest shows their departure as Denmark. They left Luxembourg to Liverpool and then on to the US.
Immigration of Mathias, Theodor Dietrich, and Pierre Peter Linden.
Source Citation: Year: 1871; Arrival: New York , United States; Microfilm serial: M237; Microfilm roll: M237_345; Line: 12; List number: 682.
Source Information: Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006. Original data:
Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1897-1957; (National Archives Microfilm Publication T715, 8892 rolls); Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

Description:
 This database is an index to the passenger lists of ships arriving from foreign ports at the port of New York from 1820-1957. In addition, the names found in the index are linked to actual images of the passenger lists. Information contained in the index includes given name, surname, age, gender, arrival date, port of arrival, port of departure and ship name.
New York Passenger Lists Record
Theodor LINDEN
Name: Theodor LINDEN
Arrival Date: 17 Jul 1871
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1812
Age: 59
Gender: Male
Port of Departure: Liverpool, England and Queenstown, Ireland
Destination: United States of America
Place of Origin: Denmark
Ship Name: Abyssinia
Port of Arrival: New York
Line: 12
Microfilm Serial: M237
Microfilm Roll: 345
List Number: 682
Port Arrival State: New York
Port Arrival Country: United States


Mathias LINDEN and Catherina POTT

Mathias LINDEN and Katie POTT were married at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Aurora Illinois on 4 January 1882. Witnesses were Henry LINDEN and Margarete BIEVER

Matt LINDEN became a naturalized citizen in 1880 in the Circuit Court of Kane County, Illinois.
Source: Name: Mathius (alternate spelling) LINDEN
Year: 1880
Place: Illinois
Source Publication Code: 3703.1
Primary Immigrant: LINDEN, Mathius (alternate spelling)
Annotation: Date and place of declaration of intent or final papers. Extracted from records of the Elgin and Aurora City Courts and the Kane County Court/Circuit Court housed at the Circuit Court office in Geneva, the county seat. Copies of the original documents can be obtained from the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Kane County, Illinois, Box 112, Geneva, IL 60134.
Source Bibliography: KANE COUNTY, ILLINOIS NATURALIZATION RECORDS,1857-1906. Geneva, IL: Kane County Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 504, Geneva, IL 60134, 1988. 162p.
Page: 86
(Source: Ancestry.com)

Mathias LINDEN died very suddenly at his home 114 Forrest Ave, Aurora, Kane, Illinois, Sunday afternoon at 3 PM on 3 January 1909. Mr. LINDEN who was 54 years old suffered a stroke of apoplexy and despite the fact that Dr. Pulfer was summoned soon after he was stricken he passed away after an illness of a few hours. He leaves his widow, six children, Nicholas, Peter, Bernard, John, Mary, and Lena LINDEN all of Aurora.
(Source: Aurora Beacon News, January 4, 1909.)

The funeral was held at St. Joseph's Church. Interment at St. Joseph's Cemetery.


“The POTTs (originally wroted in 1730 Poott) came from Roth. Must be important people because one is titled Synodalis.Normally the = Second citizan after the major. But Roth was very larger as today . To Roth in the 17 an 18 century = belong also the Downtown of Vianden. Vianden was a majestic Castle and =
forteress. With big walls around . People living intra muros are baptisized in = Vianden. People outside the walls baptisized in Roth.”

(Source: Rob Deltgen [mailto:rdeltgen@pt.lu]=20
Sent: Sunday, October 17, 2004 1:52 AM)

Saturday, November 28, 2009

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Famous Look-Alikes



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Nancy Fermazin (me) and Grace Worthing (mom)
The system says that my current photograph looks like celebrities:

* Martine McCutcheon - 71%
* Mini Anden - 70%
* Liza Minnelli - 64%
* Missi Pyle - 63%
* Mia Kirshner - 60%
* Janice Dickinson - 59%
* Dakota Fanning - 59%
* Christie Brinkley - 57% (I wish)


Like Randy there weren't any real bad people or murderers on my collage list.I don't know half of these people.

I also did one for my mother at age 25 and her celebrity look-alikes include:
* Rob Bourdon - 72%
* Patricia Arquette - 71%
* Carole King - 68%
* Julie Andrews - 68%
* Andie MacDowell - 66%
* Jena Malone - 64%
* Julia Roberts - 63%
* Rachel Stevens - 62%
Mom would have liked Julie Andrews and Julia Roberts.

Sunday, November 8, 2009

Fermazin Family History





In researching our family history in Posen, Prussia, Poland we found Friedrich Formazin. He was the son of Daniel Formaezyn born about 1785 and Mariana Soblinska. This has not been confirmed but from emails to a Kasia, a genealogy researcher in present day Poland we are pretty convinced this is so.

We pick Friedrich Vormazin up in Labischin, Kreis Schubin in 1840 as a 21 year old lad getting married to Louise Bonau. Friedrich Vormazin Formazin married Louise Bonau (possibly Huguenaut name) in Labischin on Dec.6,1840.Per his marriage records he was single, age 21, and resided in Ruhden*, his father was deceased at time of marriage, while Louise is also listed as single 24 years and 5 months. Of this marriage they had four children, August, Henriette, Stephan, and Caroline. Louise Bonau died from cholera in 1852 with one of their daughters, leaving behind three young children. Louise Bonau died from cholera Sept 25, 1852.
Friedrich Formazin remarried, also in Labischin:
On Jan.9,1853 Friedrich Formazin widower of Rynarzewo age 31, "Einwohner" got married to Justine Braun, daughter of mailman of Arnoldowo age 25 years, 6 months,
Entry # 7/1853: Source
Louise and Friedrich made their home in Labischin. Of this union they had four children, August, Henriette, Stephan, and Caroline. We have quite a bit of information on August Vormazin Formazin. As for the name of Vormazin and Formazin, we seem to find Vormazin in the Labischin records but after the birth of August, Henriette, Stephan, and Caroline Vormazin, the last name changes from Vormazin to Formazin. Vormazin was probably the phonetic pronunciation of Formazin. My grandfather Robert August Fermazin was named after his uncle August Formazin.
August was born almost 9 months to the day, on 07 September 1841 in Florentowo, a parish of Schubin and lived most of his adult life in Labishin but died on 29 March 1921 at the age of 79 years. in Kreis Mogilno in the village of Kwieciszewo He was baptised 12 September 1841. Witnesses to this baptism were Carl Meyer, August Reddmann, Renate Pinau (? Ristau) spelling), and Eva Meyer. Being the first born, to Friedrich Fermazin, August must have had a special place in his father’s heart. Even though Formazin moved around much of August’s childhood, August did grow up to become a master tailor and settled in the town of Kwieciszewo.
Henriette came along on 9 October 1845 when they were living in Florentowo. She was baptized on 29 October 1849 and her godparents were Michael Fenske, Justine Reddmann, Christine Wegner, Anna Schmidt, and Justine Lurke. These must have been friends and neighbors to the Vormazin’s as some were the same sponsors for August’s christening. Henriette died at an early age, age 5 of cholera. However, from the birth records and baptism it appears Henriette may have not been the healthiest of children since she was not baptized until age 4. Possibly this could be because Louise and Friedrich were moving around so much, with him being an einwhohner and not a schoenfaerber.
Stephan was born on 15 October 1847 in Bagno and baptized 17 October 1847 in Schubin. Witnesses to the christening were Heinrich Brachschein, Justine Brachschein, and Daniel Kopicke. At the time of Stephan’s birth Friedrich was not a Schoenfaerber but an Einwhohner (inhabitant) according to the occupation listed on the birth records. This means that he was probably a farm laborer without possessions. These people are often found to have moved a lot in contrast to farmers who were always bound to their land.
Little Caroline was born on the 13 August 1850 with Friedrich and Louise living in the village of Rynarzewo. She was baptized on 18 August 1850 with the witnesses being Eduard Zillmmer, Louise Wienkauf, August Bartung and Friedrich being listed as einwohner. Friedrich was working a farm (einwohner) in the village of Rynarzewo.
Friedrich and Louise were married only twelve years before she passed. At age 34 on 25 September 1852, Louise passed away from cholera and left behind four small children. The family was living in Rynarzewo at this time. Nine year old Henriette, the second child born 9 October 1843, in Florentowo also died of cholera two days later on 27 September 1852. The three children, August age 11, Stephan age 5, and Caroline 2 were left behind for Friedrich to raise without a mother. How tragic and sad. This was a common occurrence in those days due to no vaccinations and poor sanitation. Cholera was a very painful disease.
Unfortunately the Friedrich Formazin family was impacted by cholera with the two deaths of his beloved wife and oldest daughter. Friedrich was a man of the land, a farmer so he needed help raising his children after Louise died. So on January 9, 1853 Friedrich Formazin married Justine Braun, age 25 years and 6 months, the daughter of the local mailman of Arnoldowo. This custom of remarrying was very common in those years so that the men had a mother for the children, a soul mate and a housewife for the family home, and a companion to love and cherish. We suspect Justine and her family were probably friends of the Formazin family.
Children of Friedrich Formazin and Louise Bonau
We have quite a bit of information on August Vormazin Formazin. As for Vormazin and Formazin, we seem to find Vormazin in the Labischin records but after the birth of August, Henriette, Stephan, and Caroline Vormazin, the last name changes from Vormazin to Formazin. Vormazin was probably the phonetic pronunciation of Formazin. My grandfather Robert August Fermazin was named after his uncle August Formazin. Being the first born of Friedrich Fermazin he must have had a special place in his father’s heart.

August Formazin son of Friedrich Formazin
August Formazin grew up and married Ernestine Kurz in 1865 at age 25. By this time August was working as a master tailor in the village of Jadownik. Later they moved on to Kwieciszewo. At the civil registration office of Gebice Land ( German Gembitz Land) the birth records October 1874-1895 and marriages and deaths 1895-1902 show that August Formazin and his spouse, Ernestine nee Kurz, must have bought a property there as records list him as landowner and master tailor. They settled there about 1877, since their older children were born there. August and Ernestine were happily married for 35 years. After Ernestine’s death August remarried Otilie Schmidt in 1900 and lived until 29 March 1921. We have only the death records of Ernestine and the marriage records of August Formazin and Otilie Schmidt but do not know if they had any children.
Children of August Formazin
Gustav Theophil, the first born was born 19 May 1866 in the village of Jadownik and died as an infant a few days later on 26 May 1866. We haven’t found the other children of this union from 1866 to Anna Augusta Formazin’s birth in Kwieciszewo on 11 July 1867. Anna was named after her aunt Augusta (daughter of Friedrich Formazin and his second wife Justine Braun) and her father August but we will talk about them later. Anna grew up and married Wilhelm Heinrich Koerner 21 June 1905 in Gembitz. Wilhelm Koerner was born 19 July 1880 in Hamelin, Hamelin County Germany. Witnesses for Anna and Wilhelm’s marriage were August Formazin age 62, her father, who was now living in Blutenau and Franz Hartel age 40 of Gembitz.
According to the civil registration Amalia Emma Formazin, Evangelical, was born 8 July 1876 in Dombrowo Forsthaus district of Wongrowitz, and resided in Kwieciszewo. Amalia was named after her aunt Amelia Emily Formazin (daughter of Friedrich Formazin and his third wife, Caroline Hartwich) whom we will discuss later. Witnesses to the birth of Amalia Emma were Carl Busse age 45 of Kwieciszewo and master carpenter Arnold Gregor age 45 of Kwieciszewo. Amalia grew up in Kwieciszewo, and married Maxmillan Sobieszewski Strecker on 8 June 1898 in Kwieciszewo according to the records. Max was born on 9 August 1867 in the village of Strelno. Max’s birth name was Sobieszewski but later according to court records dated 30 January 1907 in the court (postanowienie) House in Mogilno, Max and Amalia changed their last name to Strecker. For what reason we do not know. Max was the son of the deceased Fritz Sobieszewski of and Minna Nee (von) Heyden of Strelno.
Helene Ernestine (named after her mother) was born 31 March 1879 and registered on 5 April 1879.
Wilhelmine Motilie was born 4 September 1880 and registered on 11 September 1880.
Friedrich Wilhelm was born 3 February 1882 named of course after grandpa Friedrich Formazin and his birth was registered on 7 February 1882.
Wilhelmine and Berte (I am pretty certain that Berte was the daughter of August Fermazin, just that we haven’t found her birth records yet) later traveled to America on the ship, Albano arriving in New York on 13 April 1896 to visit their grandfather, Friedrich and Uncle Stephan living in Chicago. According to the ship manifest and the records from the Ellis Island data base they had two suitcases and were on there way to Chicago. I imagine this was exciting for two young women ages 21 and 16: the ship life, the other passengers, the excitement, the anticipation etc arriving at Ellis Island, New York city…Wonder if anyone was there to meet them?
After the death of Louise and Henriette, Friedrich later married Justine Braun from Arnoldowo, Labischin, Posen, Prussia on 09 January 1853 in the Labischin Parish ("Einwohner" married Justine Braun, daughter of mailman of Arnoldowo age 25 years, 6 months Entry # 7/1853). After this entry we find no more Formazin’s living in Labischin so they must have moved out. Of this marriage we know of two children, Augusta and Karl (Charles). Julia Augusta was born 08 July 1857 and Karl was born November 1859
. From: Correspondence email: Thomas Vogel July 28, 2003 to Nancy Fermazin
Now, let's start with the last place you were searching for.
Today it is called KWIECISZEWO. As you can see at www.pilot.pl it lies in the middle between Mogilno and Strzelno (Strelno in German). It probably was in the Kreis Mogilno and about 30-40 km South of Schubin, Bagno and Kanalskrug.

The age you give for Friedrich (* ca. 1824) is reasonable to think that the Stephan I found (*1847) is really his son. Possibly Friedrich married several times. It was not unusual for that time.

The thing that puzzles me a little bit is that Caroline came to America earlier than her husband. Normally the men traveled first and tried to earn money to pay for the passage of their family. It is, however, quite clear that he stayed some time in the area around Bremen before leaving (Oldenburg was a town and the Grand-duchy West of Bremen http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/ger1871.html).

Don't be surprised about age differences you find in US census recordings. I also had one uncle who emigrated in about 1900 and I read in his will that he considered himself to be 4 years younger than he actually was.
I guess, no one really cared about numbers. Only in cases where a certain age was required (military, marriage?) people certainly adjusted a little bit. Probably you may also be right with your assumption that the registrer might have estimated (parents probably know the age difference of their children - so this is mostly correct).
There is one correction I have to make:
Friedrich Vormazin (in 1847) was not "Schoenfaerber" - he was a "Einwohner" (inhabitant). That means that he was probably a farm labourer without land possession. These people are often found to have moved a lot. In contrast to farmers who where always bound to their land.
Reference: Correspondence email Thomas Vogel July 28, 2003 Posen List serv
There were no more Formazins in Labischin parish up to 1862 when parish records end. Later, in the civil registry of Rynarschewo, I found no birth, marriage nor death records up to 1881.So, they moved out. We are still looking for the eight years from 1853 to 1862 for Friedrich Formazin. During this time he is married to Justine Braun and has two more children that we know of, Augusta and Karl. . We assume that Justine had died around 1861 and the widower Friedrich remarried Carolina Hartwig. Julia Augusta emigrated to the USA and sent for Karl who came later around 1872.

By the time Friedrich emigrates to the USA his name has changed from Vormazin, Formazin, and is now Fermazin and is married to Carolina Hartwig.  Friedrich immigrated from Oldenburg in 1879, arriving in New York, December 12, 1879 with his daughter Emilie (Amelia) on the ship Ohio. His manifest number was 15789. The entry read

Passenger name Friedrich Fermazin male
Age 55
Occupation: None
Last residence: Oldenburg
Port of Embarktation: Bremen
Mode of transportation: Steerage
Final destination: Ohio
Purpose for travel: Staying in USA but not a citizen of USA
Source FTM CD # 356 Passenger Immigration Lists: Germans to America, 1875-1888.
Ira Glazier and Filby, Germans to America Volume 34, page 412.

We are not sure when Fred Fermazin settled in Aurora,Kane, Illinois. He is on the 1880 census for Aurora, Kane County Illinois in 1880 and he shows up in the city directory of 1887. In 1880 census of Ilinois it lists Friedrich Fermazin as a farmer and later on a milk dealer.

Holland's Aurora City directory of 1887-1890 lists
Fermazin, Fred as a milk dealer, residing at W.s. Ohio 2s.Sixth av.
After 1890 Fred Fermazin does not show up in the city Directories.
In Holland's Aurora City Directory of 1910-1911 it lists
Fermazin, Carrie, wid Fred residing at 569 5th Ave

Copyright © 2006 by Nancy Fermazin Peralta von Reyn

Saturday, November 7, 2009

FERMAZIN Poem

I wrote a poem about my FERMAZIN Family. I would like to share it with you.

FERMAZIN+PEDIGREE+COLLAGE.JPG.jpg


FERMAZIN

For my Fermazin family I looked and looked
And soon on genealogy I was hooked
At last I found them in the census
And as a consensus
Their name was Fermazine, which rhymes with magazine
But in the 1880 census it was Fermotsene
Years ago was known as Vormazin
And Formazin
And became Fermazin
Which rhymes with win

They came from Schubin, Posen, Prussia
Even though one reference says Russia
In Prussia they were descendents from Alasace
Who came as farmers to take up space
In the land
That once was Poland
But now it belonged to Prussia
And was known as Posen

Daniel Formazin and Mariana Soblenska married in Posen
Who’s son Friedrich Formazin
We find him living as a single fellow in 1840 Ruhden
He has met and married Louisa Bonau
The pretty lass from Bagno

In 1840 Schubin they made their home in the village, Labischin
And were known as Vormazin
Friedrich was an einwohner
Not a schoenfaerber
Which means he didn’t own the land where he was residing
But was an inhabitant who moved around a lot to earn a living

By 1842 they are living in Florentowo
And Kwieciszewo
Of this union they had August, Henriette, Stephan, and Carolina
But it 1852 along came the cholera
It took the lives of little Henriette and Louisa
So Friedrich was alone to raise the children she left
And to say the least he was bereft

Friedrich Formazin widower of Renarzewo,
Age 31, an einwohner went off to Arnoldowo
Where he met and married Justine Brauer
Daughter of a mailman who saved the hour
They had two children, Julia Augusta and Karl of whom are shown
But maybe more that may not be known
For these ten years of his life
We haven’t found the records with this wife

But it wasn’t long until again he was alone
And Justine too was gone
Alone again in ’62
And living in Kwieciszewo

As a widower again he off and finds a new wife to combat his strife
Carolina Hartwig is that one who he spends the remainder of his life
Marriage to Carolina Hartwig adds three more to his line
Of which he now has nine

While living in Godziwy
Is born Reinhart, Bertha, and Emily

By 1877 his oldest son August is married to Ernestine Kurz and working as a master tailor
Raising children of his own, the father of four

Stephan grows up to marry Emma Kunkel and has his own three
Hedwig, Ann, and Waldemar and on their way to the USA, land of the free
Caroline of Labischin is now all grown up and of age
Of which we don’t know much about her lineage
She has stayed in Posen
To live the life she has chosen

By 1878, Carolina Hartwig Fermazin, and the children Bertha and Reinhart have left Schubinland
And are sailing on the Weiland
One year later Friedrich and his daughter Emily Amelia
Are on the ship Ohio (a)
Steaming to America

Karl and Augusta came before the others in 1872
Settled in Aurora, Illinois with whom we do not know,
But made do

Of all of them who came
Uncle Reinhart ‘twas of fame
He married thrice, and homesteaded in Lemon, South Dakota far
And found time to fight in the Spanish American War
Friedrich and Carolina were his mom and dad
For whom he was glad
August, Stephan, Henriette, Caroline, Amelia, Bertha, Augusta, and Karl were his siblings, kin
And never they drank any gin
Because for them it was beer and sauerkraut
Which was their heritage I do not doubt

Reinhart married Charlotte Wittelsbach, Otto and Frieda’s daughter
Who died one year later
In 1905 of heart failure
Soon thereafter, in the summer of 1906, we find him with his second wife, Lillian Ryland
Working as a motorman living in Chicagoland

By this time Adam Weis has swept Amelia off her feet
They settled in Aurora where they farmed wheat
JD Watkins, a fireman married Bertha
And they settled too in Aurora
Julia Augusta married Mr. Giese
And they settled in Batavia you see
Great Grandpa Karl Americanized his name to Charles Daniel
Not Nathaniel
And married Minnie Plucker who was so beautiful
And she gave him seven children, so wonderful
They were Robert August, Carl Emil, Irene Laura, and Henriette Jean
William, Harry, and Charlotte Lottie Fermazine

Robert August, my grandpapa married Mary Linden
They had three children
Lola, Robert, and Irene

Lola grew up to be a splendid lady of eighty eight years old
Irene Mabel died at two years old
Robert was a mischievous rascal but finally made it to manhood
And married Grace Lorraine who was nothing but good

They had two girls named Mary Kathryn
And Nancy Roberta Fermazin
Who now carry on the family line from Schubin

Remember for my Fermazin family I looked and looked
And soon, I found on genealogy I was hooked
At last I found them in the census
And remember as a consensus
It was Fermotsene
Which rhymed with magazine
And years ago was even known as Vormazin
And Formazin
After many years the name evolved to Fermazin
Which rhymes with Gershwin

By Nancy Fermazin

Copyright © 2008 by Nancy Fermazin Peralta von Reyn
[was published in Everton's Genealogical Helper, December 2008]

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

Scrapbooking Fermazin Family History





















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I thought I would share a glimpse of my Scrapbooking My Family History with you today. Last summer I worked on a Fermazin Family Scrapbook. It is a work in progress as I am still adding pages. I made an 8x8 for my grandson Peter, along with a movie DVD to match. For my cousin Karen, my sister Mary, and myself I made a 12x12 Digital/hybrid scrapbook. I used pages from Memory Mixer, ideas from Stampington's Somerset Memories, Rhonda Farer kit and my own creations on Photoshop Elements.
Any comments would be appreciated.
Copyright © 2009 by Nancy Fermazin Peralta von Reyn

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Robert F. Fermazin Dad, Opa, Grandpa, Great Grandpa


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The Trip
Driving into the driveway, I saw Dad sitting on the wooden bench on the front porch with Rusty, our 100 pound yellow lab, at his side. Rusty seemed to follow Dad everywhere these days. Where Rusty was, Dad was. Rusty was Bill’s dog but he had taken a special like to Dad the last few months. Maybe, because Dad was home all day and Rusty had a companion. Dad was wearing a long sleeve blue plaid shirt with a western bolo tie around his neck. His shirt was wrinkle free and neatly tucked into his Levis. He was wearing the brown leather belt, with the large silver buckle with RF, his initials engraved on it. This belt was special to him. Bill and I gave it to him for his birthday last April. As I was getting out of the van, he greeted me. “Hi Daughter. We’re going out to Mimi’s for dinner tonight. Bill says it’s okay.” “Well, let’s go inside, and I’ll get ready.”
‘Dapper Dan’, as Bill fondly called him was ready. Walking towards the front door, Dad pushed Buddy behind the recliner chair. Buddy was the name, Dad gave his oxygen tank. He wasn’t planning on taking Buddy tonight. There was no sense arguing about it. Dad didn’t much like Buddy. Many times he left Buddy home when he went out. Bill picked Buddy up and put it in the back of the van. Buddy was dad’s constant companion and sidekick that accompanied him everywhere this past year, since being diagnosed with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).
Out the door we went. Dad with his brown Stetson hat. Pinned on the rim were two buttons, “Your Barn or Mine?” and “Damn, I’m Good.” Dad wore this hat to the American Legion on Friday nights. Walking in the Legion doors, he would tip the rim towards the ladies, saying, “Your Barn or mine tonight?” Dad had gone to the American Legion every Friday night for the last forty years. He used to drink vodka and orange juice, then beer, but the last three years it was plain orange juice. Now, Friday nights were Mimi’s with Nancy and Bill.
CHF was taking its toll on Dad. He was losing weight. Most of his calories were used for breathing. He slept throughout the day while we were out, giving him a surge of energy in the evening. He tried to conceal how much the disease was taking its toll, but we saw his weight go from 160 to 120 pounds this past year. Bill and I tried to lead as normal a life as possible. We continued to work, took hikes, dinners out, and a few short trips and in general tried to deny dad’s disease progression. The month of October, 2005, found Dad feeling weaker. He was still doing a little work, but feeling very tired and having trouble eating. . We tried to deny Dad’s deteriorating health, even though we were his primary care givers.
The four of us, Dad, Buddy, Bill, and I, arrived at Mimi’s Café , Dad’s favorite restaurant, on Friday evening about 7 PM. Sliding into the large round red booth with the black and white checkered tablecloth, Dad looked at me with a twinkle in his eye and an impish grin on his face saying, “I’m going on a trip.”
“What kind of trip? Where are you going?” I prodded.
Laying his knife down he looked at me with a big toothless grin, saying“You’ll know soon enough.”
“Tell me, where are you going? C’mon, tell me.”
Dinging his fork against his glass, Bill said, “Leave him alone. He’ll tell you when he’s ready.”
Dad was jubilant. His toothless smile stretched from ear to ear. He carried his partial plate in his shirt pocket, putting it in to eat. It didn’t fit well since his weight loss and the metal of the plate irritated his gums. Mom died three years ago. Mom and dad were married 59 years. Dad missed her so. We hadn’t seen him this happy for a long time.
Jason, our waiter, walked over. “Hello, Robert. Nice to see you and Bill and Nancy. What can I get you tonight, Robert?”
“The usual. Top sirloin skirt steak, well done and baked potato with extra butter, no sour cream and lots of onions. “
“Two cups of clam chowder for us. We are going to split the fish and chips.”
Tonight, Dad’s appetite was voracious. Over the last few months, his appetite waned. He was lucky to pick at his plate and eat an ounce of roast beef and a quarter cup of mashed potatoes. At one time he could put away four pork chops, mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, bread and dessert.
Dad was a creature of habit. His daily routine since Mom passed and he came to live with us was jam packed until two months ago. He rose at 5 AM, dressed, showered, shaved, drove to Amigo’s for coffee and toast, come back at 7 AM to take off his email, and then drive to Ford Electronics “to work” from 8 AM to 12 noon. Scott Ford had given Dad a bench and some tools to fix TVs and radios. Dad’s last position before he retired was Audio Visual Technician at the Fullerton UHSD where he bought parts from Ford Electronics. Scott and he had remained friends. This was Scott’s way of giving Dad things to do that stimulated his mind. Dad arrived home at noon, checked his email, and at 3 PM started preparing dinner by peeling potatoes and putting a roast or chicken in the oven. On Tuesday evenings, he went to the Senior Center with Mary Ann, Wednesday was TV night, Thursday was rest day, Friday was the American Legion, Saturday was dinner and a show with Mary Ann and Sundays were church, pool and dinner at Mary Ann’s. (Mary Ann was a friend of mom and dad’s from the Legion). Lately it was just church on Sunday out to dinner on Fridays and occasionally, he went to Ford Electronics or the Legion. Buddy had a lot to do with this change in habit and Mary Ann had died in September.
A lifelong church goer, Dad still wasn’t a man for a lot of God talk. God was a given presence, a fundamental fact of his eight-decade life. He continued to pray and attend church. Tears would stream down my cheeks as I passed Dad’s room in the middle of the night, hearing him praying, “Dear Jesus, come get me. Please come get me and take me home.”
After dinner on Friday night, we fell back into our routines. Monday morning arrived after an uneventful weekend“
“Are you going to work now?” dad pleaded with me at 5 AM. “No, not until about 8 AM.”
“When is Bill leaving to play golf?”
“I don’t think he is playing golf today. He wants to stay home and work on his garden.”
“No, no, no. He has to. Tell him, it’s okay with me. I will be fine. Have him play golf. I might go over to see Ford today.”
“Okay.”
Bending down, I kissed dad on the forehead as I left for work. Bill left for golf about 830 AM that morning.
An overwhelming feeling of having to go home came over me about 10 AM. I can’t leave yet. I called home. No answer. Back to calling my patients.
1030. I better go home. No I can’t leave yet. It’s too early for lunch. I called home again. No answer.
1100 AM. I better go home. No, I better call a couple of more patients. I just got here at 9 AM.
At 1130, I went home for lunch to check on dad. I arrived home at 12 noon. Dad’s van was in the driveway. That’s strange. He said he was going to Ford Electronics.
Unlocking the front door, I glanced in the den. No dad. No Rusty. “Dad? Dad?” No answer.
“Rusty? Rusty?” No answer. Rusty must be outside. I better let him in. I raced through the house, from dad’s TV room to the kitchen, through the living room, calling, “Dad? Dad?”
I didn’t see him anywhere. I came down the hall to dad’s bedroom. Dad was lying on the floor, on his side with his arm under his head. Rusty was lying next to him. I knelt down
and touched him realizing he was not sleeping but was cold and had died. There was a big toothless open mouth smile, frozen on his face. Screaming loudly, I ran to the phone and called Bill and 911. I told them I found my dad and he was dead. I called Pastor Tim. The paramedics, the coroner, Pastor Tim and Bill arrived home to comfort me. Bill was crying while holding me in his arms, saying, "It’ll be ok.” The coroner comforted us saying, “It looks like your dad could not get up on the bed so he laid down on the floor to rest.” The coroner estimated that Dad passed about 10 AM. Dad passed peacefully. Just that little statement from the coroner offered consolation to us and relieved our guilt for not being there.
Reflecting back, Dad indeed, had prepared for a trip. He wanted us out of the house that day. He planned it that way. On the 10 inch by 6 inch side table in his den, methodically arranged were his wallet, toothbrush, toothpaste, car and house keys, and his check book. As a former Hospice nurse, I did not recognize my dad’s plan to take a trip. Planning a trip is a very common occurrence in the elderly about three days before they pass. They are always saying they are going on a ‘trip. People die the way they live, only more so. Dad lived by the schedule; now he had scheduled himself for death. I didn’t realize it on Friday night. Angela, the Hospice, nurse brought it to my attention. Angela comforted us saying that she felt that mom had been Dad’s angel and came and helped him pack for his final trip. I would like to believe that.

Epilogue: We lost both Dad and Rusty within nine months. Dad passed peacefully on November 5, 2005 at 10 AM. Rusty died July 31, 2006 of Congestive Heart Failure.
Copyright © 2008 by Nancy Fermazin Peralta von Reyn

Monday, September 28, 2009

Ahnentafel Roulette

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Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Ahnentafel Roulette by Randy Seaver of www.geneamusings.com



It's Saturday Night - time for some Genealogy Fun AND I FORGOT TO POST!

SO I'm a WEEK LATE! HERE GOES...............




The assignment was:



1) How old is your father now, or how old would he be if he had lived? Divide this number by 4 and round the number off to a whole number. This is your "roulette number."



2) Use your pedigree charts or your family tree genealogy software program to find the person with that number in your ahnentafel. Who is that person?



3) Tell us three facts about that person with the "roulette number."



4) Write about it in a blog post on your own blog, in a Facebook note or comment, or as a comment on this blog post.



5) If you do not have a person's name for your "roulette number" then spin the wheel again - pick your mother, or yourself, a favorite aunt or cousin, or even your children!



HERE IS MINE



1) My father was born in 1916 so he would have been 93 right now. Dividing by 4 gives me 23 rounded off.

Favorite All Time Song: Chatanooga Choo Choo



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It's Saturday Night - time for some Genealogy, and Family History, Fun!says Randy Seaver on http://www.geneamusings.com/

Our assignment for the evening - if we wish to participate in the Fun
1. What is your all-time favorite song? Yep, number 1. It's hard to choose sometimes. If you made your favorite all-time Top 40 music selections, what would be #1?

I could not decide if it would be Chicago Chicago by Frank Sinatra or Chatanooga Choo Choo by Glenn Miller.
2. Tell us about it. Why is it a favorite? Do you have special memories attached to this song? I decided on Chatanooga Choo Choo because of the words "She's gonna cry
Until I tell her that I'll never roam
So Chattanooga choo choo". And my dad worked for the C, B, & Q RR for many years.

3. Write your own blog post about it, or make a comment on this post or on the Facebook entry.

Pardon me, boy
Is that the Chattanooga choo choo?
Track twenty-nine
Boy, you can gimme a shine
I can afford
To board a Chattanooga choo choo
I've got my fare
And just a trifle to spare

You leave the Pennsylvania Station 'bout a quarter to four
Read a magazine and then you're in Baltimore
Dinner in the diner
Nothing could be finer
Than to have your ham an' eggs in Carolina

When you hear the whistle blowin' eight to the bar
Then you know that Tennessee is not very far
Shovel all the coal in
Gotta keep it rollin'
Woo, woo, Chattanooga there you are

There's gonna be
A certain party at the station
Satin and lace
I used to call "funny face"
She's gonna cry
Until I tell her that I'll never roam
So Chattanooga choo choo

Won't you choo-choo me home?
Chattanooga choo choo
Won't you choo-choo me home?

Chatanooga Choo Choo by Glenn Miller is my favorite all time song that reminds me of my mom and dad, Robert Fermazin and Grace (Gigi) Worthing.

Love at First Sight

"She's gonna cry
Until I tell her that I'll never roam
So Chattanooga choo choo"

“Wow mom that is quite a story! Just think you and dad are celebrationg fifty years of marriage. That’s a long time. How did you meet?”
“ That was the year of one snow fall after another. I remember it well. It seemed like it snowed and snowed and snowed. Aurora received more snow that year than in the forty previous years. December was cold. January was cold and in February there was a blizzard. The Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor the day before we became engaged.”
Excitement and energy were bursting in the air at the Fermazin family home. Robert finally took the big step. Robert was engaged! They were sitting around the Philco console radio in Robert’s home when President Roosevelt addressed Congress that day, saying: “Yesterday, December 7, 1941 - a date that will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan ... Hostilities exist.” For Grace and Robert that was just like yesterday.
Mom remembered the flurry of excitement shopping for her diamond engagement ring that weekend, snow or no snow. There was snow, slush, and drifts piled high along the highways on the outskirts of down town, Aurora, in driveways, and backyards all over the city. The snowfall was constant from the end of October to March. Winters in Aurora were renowned for their wind and cold. However, this year was the snowiest December in the last forty years in the Chicago area. At five degrees below zero, the Fox River began to freeze over. The snow crunched under your feet and the wind blew through your hair causing you to shiver as you walked down Broadway. Store windows were aglow with Christmas lights and decorations lined the sidewalks. Holly and glittering silver and blue lights wound around the tall street lamps which illuminated the sidewalks with glowing warmth. The radios pounded out big band leader Glen Miller’s Chattanooga Choo Choo withTex Beneke singing: “Pardon me, boy. Is that the Chattanooga choo choo...? So Chattanooga choo choo won’t you choo-choo me home
After a courtship of one month, with the uncertainties of the future, the Great Depression behind them, Robert and Grace became engaged. They met on a blind date arranged by Robert’s best friend, Walt Ahlgren and his fiancée, Dorothy. (unbeknownst to Robert, Grace and Dorothy were great friends) It was love at first sight. Robert and Grace came to know one another by enjoying many activities in a short time: movies, family get-togethers, parties with friends, and ice skating on Lake Mastodon at Phillip’s Park. Robert was the city champion ice skater for many years as a pre-teen and teenager so he enjoyed impressing Grace with figure eights, skating backwards, jumping and twisting on ice along with many other moves.
Robert Linden Fermazin was the middle child of a first generation German and Luxembourger family. At times you could hear German spoken in the home when the older generation wanted to talk privately and most assuredly hear Luxembourgish spoken by his mother, Mary, when talking to her sister, Lena. This was a loving home. They were a close knit family having weathered many uncertainties during the depression. Robert resembled his mother in looks and build. He was short at 5’7”, 160 pounds; black naturally curly hair and mischievous blue gray eyes, sometimes blue and sometimes granite gray depending on Robert’s temperament. For most of his twenty-six years, Robert was care-free and happy-go-lucky. Robert or Buddy as he was known to family and Fermy as he was fondly nicknamed by his friends was a known prankster and the life of the party. When Robert wasn’t partying his serious side held down a full time job at Thor Power Tool Company as a journey man machinist.
Robert wasn’t always so care free or well off. During the depression he ice skated three miles along the streets from 5th Avenue to Sacred Heart School and in the spring he roller skated. There were no buses in those days. As, Buddy got older he spent the summers working in the greenhouse during the day for a $1.00 a day. Once a year, Robert's duties included changing the mulch for the roses. He and the other guys used to go out in the surrounding countryside and bring fresh dirt back for replacement in the rose beds. Prior to going out for new dirt, they emptied the rose beds. One time Robert was given the job of "mulching" the rose beds. This job meant taking a big bag of steer manure around to all the roses and reaching in with your bare hand and pulling out a handful and placing it by each rose. Robert refused to do this job the next time, so he was given the permanent job of digging up fresh dirt and replacing the beds. After a long day at the nursery, he set pins at the bowling alley each evening.
On weekends he wasn't idle. He caddied across the street from home at the golf course. At the end of the week, he turned all the money over to Mary, who used it for necessities of life. Mary gave Robert a dollar on Friday night to go out on the town. That was when gasoline was 2 gallons for a quarter and (they thought that was EXPENSIVE!!) bread was 10 cents a loaf and milk 12 cents a quart.
For food in the depression, the family ate lots of carrots and home grown vegetables. Buddy and his dad used to go hunting for squirrel, pigeon, and rabbits and in the winter time they trapped and caught swamp rats (muskrat). Robert recalled his dad was famous for a bulls eye with each shot. He was so good Robert recalls he shot them in the head. Buddy remembers his first game rabbit. He shot the rabbit with a 410 shot gun 10 feet away and wouldn't you know it he blew it to smithereens. Too close.
Grace Worthing, on the other hand, was a shy, quiet, twenty-five year old orphan, having lost her mother at age twelve from a brain tumor and her father at age sixteen from cancer of the pancreas, lived in Aurora for about seven years before meeting Robert. Grace met Robert officially on a blind date, but she knew him from his reputation of motor cycle antics up and down Broadway on Saturday nights. She would not have chosen him on her own to date. Grace was 5’ tall, petite, weighing eighty-nine pounds, of Welsh descent, with medium length, dark brown-black hair, and gold green hazel eyes which turned green when the sun hit them. She hailed from the romantic area of Truro, Iowa and the covered bridges, later made famous by Clint Eastwood and Meryl Streep. Truro was a town of two hundred, nestled in southwestern Madison County Iowa. At age sixteen, she moved from Truro to a farm in the village of Birds Run, Ohio to live with her step-brother, Walter. This did not work out for personal reasons and Grace moved into the city to live with her cousin, Eppie, where she cooked, cleaned, and baby-sat for her room and board which prepared her for her future job as nanny and housekeeper. At age eighteen, she moved to Aurora to live with her half-sister, Blanche. By the time she met Robert, life had stabilized. She had a few close friends and one best friend, Marie Vaghey. Grace worked as a live-in nanny and housekeeper for a wealthy family in town.
Promptly the next day, after President Roosevelt’s speech, Robert and Grace became engaged, as life’s uncertainties, the war in the background, and the thought of the draft were now present. A paradigm shift occurred suddenly for them. Life changed for all the day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Robert and Grace did not know what their world was going to bring. Christmas and the merriment of the season and their engagement excitement changed.
A major set back occurred in their plans. Grace was Baptist and Robert was Catholic. They went to the priest to make the wedding arrangements, but he insisted they attend marriage counseling first, Grace take instructions, and wait one year before marrying. He refused to marry them. Well, they didn’t let this stop their resolve. They were madly in love, they had also survived the Great Depression and determination was part of their make-up. Robert and Grace refused to wait. Thirty years ago, Robert’s parents encountered a similar situation. His father was Lutheran and his mother was Catholic.
Robert’s father solved the dilemma. He took them to meet with Pastor Miller at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. The pastor agreed to marry them if they both attended St. Paul’s and pledged to raise their children in the Lutheran faith. They agreed. They set the wedding date.
Exactly, to the day, two months after the United States declared war on Japan, Robert and Grace were married. Mom remembered that as the day a late snowstorm moved into the area, about 4 AM dumping four inches of snow setting a record for the largest amount of snow recorded on that date with at least six inches more predicted for the weekend. The wedding went on as planned. They were married on a cold, cloudy day, the wind whistling in the air with a light flutter of snow blanketing the ground. Grace was bundled up in a brown fur coat, wrapped tightly around her thin frame to keep warm with Robert wearing a dark gray suit and hat with wool lined, black, ankle length overcoat covering his small frame for the trip to the church.


Addendum: One year later Robert and Grace were married by the Catholic Church. The priest relented after Grace completed instructions in the Catholic faith. They had their first daughter a year later in 1943 and she was raised Catholic. Grace attended the Catholic Church for many years with Robert and the children but did not convert until 1955. This union lasted fifty-nine years until Grace’s death in 2001.

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Wordless Wednesday September 16, 2009

My mother - I miss her very much,Born 92 years, 7 months, and 7 days ago today
Wordless Wednesday, 9 September 2009
Grace Lorraine Worthing was born on 9 February 1917 in Truro, Iowa, a twin. Mother was Nancy Theo Ames and father was Charles Edward Worthing. Grace grew up in Truro. Her mother died in 1928 and her father died in 1933. In 1933 she moved to New Concord, Ohio to live with Eppie Castor Mossholder until she was 18. At 18 years old she moved to Aurora, Illinois to join her half sister Blanche Hansen. She married in Aurora and raised a family there until moving to California in 1959.





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Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday September 15, 2009

MOM
Grace Lorraine Worthing Fermazin
B. 9 February 1917 in Truro Iowa
D. 17 Apr 2001
Buried at Riverside National Cemetary
Riverside, California




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Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday September 8, 2009

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Nancy Theo Ames born 14 Jan 1883 in Milton Junction, Dane, Wisconsin.
Died 30 Mar 1928 in Truro Iowa. Married to Charles E.Worthing.

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday, September 1, 2009




Fermazin, Minnie, b. 1868, d. 1952, Mother

Great Grandma Minnie
Minnie Plücker was christened Wilhelmine Elisabeth Plücker. She married Charles Daniel Fermazin. Her husband died in 1913 leaving her with one minor child Harry Harold Fermazin age 15. The other six children were young adults. To support herself she turned their house into a boarding house and took in roomers. I don't know much about Great Grandma Minnie. We were not close because she was Lutheran and we were raised Catholic. Her son, my grandfather, married a Catholic and we were brought up Catholic. When I was born, Minnie sent her son in law, Leonard Russell to the hospital to ask: "Are you going to raise her Lutheran or Catholic."My dad answered, "Catholic", as Uncle Leonard stomped out of the room. Dad remembered his Grandma Minnie as his "mean grandma". Dad always said Grandma Minnie didn't like him because he was Catholic. How sad. After I examined Minnie's life, I think she was misjudged. However, my dad saw her from a small boy's perspective. I think Minnie had a hard life raising seven children on a farm in the cold winters of Minnesota. Her husband, Charles moved the family to Minnesota in 1895 to farm. Minnie had to live a few hundred miles from her parents and siblings and friends she grew up with. The family moved from Aurora, Illinois to Lakefield, Minnesota from 1895-1910 to farm. Minnie's mother died in 1910 and her father died in 1912 while she was living in Minnesota.

b.06 Jun 1868, Aurora, Kane, Illinois. Christened in St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Auroa, Illinois. d. 17 Apr 1952. [Buried in Riverside Cemetary, Montgomery, Illinois]

Posted by Fermazin Family Genealogy
Labels: Plücker, Wilhelmina, Tombstone Tuesday

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Was she Orthera C. Palin or Cornelia A. Palon or a Scoville: Leaping over the Block Wall

I have been researching my great great grandmother Cornelia A. Palon.
Objective of Research Problem: Finding the parents of my great-great grandmother Cornelia A. Palen

Maybe I found her. If anyone has any suggestions please offer:
Who is her mother?
Who is her father?
Why is she living with the Scoville's in 1850?

Ruth Palmer said in a newspaper article in 1893 that Mrs. Ira Ames (Cornelia A Palon) was my "eldest sister". (Ruth Palmer nee Scoville per IGI)

1850 living with George and Mary Scoville in Brooklyn Greene Wisconsin
1860 not with the George Scoville family. George is now married to Autheah. Where would a 13 year old girl be?

Cornelia Palon: Born: 9 April 1847 Died: 7 March 1893

Family Bible states:
1. Born 1847, no state listed
2. 1850 US Federal Census lists Name: Orthera C Palin Age: 3 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1847 Birth Place: Michigan
3. Ames Society has birth for Cornelia Palon as Roland,Houghton, Michigan but they gave no reference
4. 1870 US Federal Census as Caroline Ames born in Pennsylvania
5. 1880 US Federal Census as Nelia Ames born in Michigan
6. This is same person as Bible list marriage date for Cornelia Palon and Ira Ames as 25 Jun 1868. Death Certificate states born in Jefferson County Wisconsin.
7. Through deductive reasoning came to conclusion Cornelia A. Palon was half sister to Ruth Scovell (Janesville Gazette article) and through inductive reasoning that Cornelia A. Palon may be Orthera C. Palon (1850 US Federal Census) born in Michigan.

Janesville Gazette: 6 May 1893
Headline: DIDN'T KNOW HER SISTER STARVED NEAR MILTON,
Mrs. Ruth Palmer Gets Word After Four Months of Mrs. Ames' Fate:
Details concerning the death of Mrs. Ira Ames near Milton Junction by starvation and exposure last -winter are sought by Mrs. Ruth Palmer, of Lyniien, Whatcom county, Washington. Mrs. Palmer has just hoard of the death through a. paragraph from the Gazette reprinted in Portland, Oregon, papers and says: "I suppose her to be my Elder sister whom I have notheard from in years." It will be remembered that Mrs. Ames and her little daughter died in a ramshackle cabin having been with, out food for several days. The child was buried in a rough box by the father. [Sister of Cornelia Palon Ames. Found her in IGI as Ruth Scoville]

1850 US Federal Census Brooklyn, Greene, Wisconsin
Cornelia A. Palon (1847 - 1893) born in ? Michigan on 09 Apr 1847 and died 7 March 1893 in Lake Koshkonong, Wisconsin. She married Ira Daniel Ames on 25 Jun 1868 in Albion Dane Wisconsin.
They had 10 children ~ Charles Henry Ames, Frankie R. Ames, Chauncey Elbert Ames, George Elliott Ames, Hiram Edison Ames, Rosey Belle Ames, Nancy Theo Ames, William Scott Ames, Marvin Franklin Ames, and Baby Girl (Caroline) Ames.
They lived in Dane County, Rock County, and Jefferson County Wisconsin.

I found the Orthera C. Palin in the 1850 US Federal Census Brooklyn, Greene, Wisconsin indexed on Ancestry.com as Orthera C Palin. She is living with George Scoville and Mary Scoville and:

George Scovell age 37, born in 1813 in Connecticut, white male, Farmer
Mary Scovell age 32 born 1818 in Kentucky, white female
George Scovell age 11 born in Connecticut
James age 10 born in Connecticut
Amisy age 9 born in Connecticut
Mary L Scovell age 2 months born in Wisconsin
Orthera C. Palin age 3 born in Michigan
Julia Scovelle age 77 born in 1773 in Vermont

Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: Brooklyn, Green, Wisconsin; Roll
M432_999; Page: 271; Image: 152.
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Seventh Census of the United States, 1850. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1850. M432, 1,009 rolls.
_____________________________________________________

I found Orthera C. Palin's sister Roth Scovell in the 1860 US Federal Census in Magnolia Dane Wisconsin. NO Cornelia A. Palin NO Orthera C. Palin in the household

George Scoville age 49 born in Connecticut, white male, Farmer Property value
$ 1800; Personal property value $ 500.
Autheah Scoville age 37 born in Vermont
Laura Scoville age 5 born in Wisconsin
Charles Scoville age 1 born in Wisconsin
George Scoville age 20 born in Connecticut, farm laborer
James Scoville age 19 born in Connecticut, farm laborer
Amisy Scoville age 18 born in Connecticut, farm laborer
Roth Scoville age 9 born in Wisconsin
Julia Mc Donald age 17 Servant born in New York

Source Citation:

Source Citation: Year: 1860; Census Place: Magnolia, Rock, Wisconsin; Roll M653_1430; Page: 453; Image: 458.
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Eighth Census of the United States, 1860. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. M653, 1,438 rolls.
_________________________________________________________________________
Specific Problem
*Family Bible states born 25 Jun 1868. No state. Census of 1850 states born in Michigan, Death Certificate states born in Jefferson County Wisconsin;
*Census 1870 states born in Pennsylvania ; Enumerated as Caroline
*Census of 1880 states born in Michigan, Enumerated as Nelia
*Have researched Jefferson County Wisconsin and found no birth records. Born before Civil Records kept. No Palons/Palen/Palin etc living in Jefferson County in 1850. This conflicts with the 1850 census where Orthea C. Palin is living with Scovell family and conflicts with Bible records.
* Looked at marriage records for Green Co WI for 1865 on a hunch. No Ames/Palon Marriages, 1865-1876 FHL US/CAN Film 1266667
* No marriage records filmed by LDS for Albion, Dane, Wisconsin
* No vital records for Albion, Dane, WI filmed by LDS
*No birth records for Jefferson, County, WI prior to 1870 filmed by LDS
* No Palon, Ames, Scovell found in Index to marriages for Jefferson County WI, 1844-1887 FHL US/CAN Film 1275662 Item 4
* No 1850 state census for Greene County Wisconsin
* No church records prior to 1856 for Green County Wisconsin or Albion, Dane, Wisconsin; No Palon births;
* No Green County Wisconsin Deeds filmed
* Examined film 1008267 Marriage index for Houghton County Michigan and no Palon, Ames, or Scovell
* Examined LDS film 126746 for 1850 Houghton County Michigan Census and no Palon, Scoville, Ames



Additional Sources:
Family Bible
Janesville Gazette
Death Certificate: Cornelia Ames

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

August Plücker (1835-1912)

I decided to find my Great Great Grandfather, Bernhard Ludwig August Plücker in the 1910 census.
Genea-Musings
http://www.geneamusings.com/
A few weeks ago, Randy Seaver of Randy's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun Genealogy Blogger threw out a Saturday night genealogy challenge.

Bernhard Ludwig August Plücker (1835-1912) married Augusta Herbold (1835-1910 ) on 27 Jan 1864 in Kohlgrund, Germany and they had eight children- Mary Maria, Barbara Addie, Wilehlmina Elisabeth, Friedrich, August Ludwig, Auguste Fredricke, Auguste Fredricke Louise, Christian, and They lived in Aurora,Kane, Illinois.

I found the family in the 1910 US Federal Census indexed on Ancestry.com as August Plucker. He is listed twice in Ancestry, once as age 73 and once as age 71. Both Census entries were dated 16 April 1910 and enumerated by Warren S. Boyle. Here is what I know about him.
*August Plucker - head, male, white, age 73, second marriage, married for 43 years. Born Germany Dutch , father born Germany Dutch, mother born Germany Dutch, naturalized, immigrated in 1867, a cabinet maker railroad, owned paid for house at 289 Columbia Street
Augusta Plucker - wife female, white, age 71 , first marriage, married for 43 years, 8 children, 5 living. Born Germany Dutch, father born Germany Dutch, mother born Germany Dutch.
Henry Plucker - son- white age 31,Single, Born Illinois, Father born Germany Dutch, Mother born Germany Dutch, a machinist in a contract shop. Owned home but mortgaged.
All spoke English in the home.
My source for this family
August Plucker arrived 23 May 1867 at age 30. Port of departure Bremen Germany and Southampton England. Ship name: Atlantic. Arrival port New York.
Sailing on ship were August Plucker, wife Auguste Plucker, and daughter age 2, Maria Plucker. Name on ship record Pluecker. Source Germans to America by Ira Glazier and P. William Filby. Vol 19, January 1867-August 1867. and source NY Passenger lists 1851-1891

Information obtained from:
Source:
1. Landeskirchiches Archiv der Evangelischen Kirche von Kurhessen-Waldeck on CD.
2. LDS Film # 1183583 See pictures posted on Permission to Emigrate.
Item 7 Die waldeckische Auswanderung zwischen 1829 und 1872 Thomas, Karl


Source citation:
1910 United States Federal Census, Illinois, Aurora Township, Aurora City, Supervisor District #2, Enumeration district # 37 , Sheet 2 B, August Plucker family, Dwelling #28. Enumerated on 16 April 1910 by Warren S. Boyle.

Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: NARA Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910. T624, 1,178 rolls.

About 1910 United States Federal Census

This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, each indexed name is linked to actual images of the 1910 Federal Census. The information recorded in the census includes: name, relationship to head of family, age at last birthday, sex, color or race, whether single, married, widowed, or divorced, birthplace, birthplace of father and mother, and more.

1910 United States Federal Census, California, San Francisco County Population Schedule, 37th Assembly District, Enumeration District 166, Sheet 10A, John W. Runnels family, Dwelling #129, Family #243, originally on National Archives Microfilm Series T624, Roll 98 (online database accessed at www.Ancestry.com on 22 August 2009).

August Plücker

August Plücker



Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Swabish (sp) or platt Deutsch (low German).

Jan DeGrandchamp to me

show details 3:45 PM (10 hours ago) Reply





Nancy,

you sure have done a lot...



Yes, it looks like we have the same great great grandfather -- Frederik Fermazin, who was Stephan Karl Fermazin's father -- if I understand correctly.



I have to see it in a lineage table and will try to set it up so I understand it better. This is a lot to digest, but it sure is interesting. I had also head that the name was Fermagen or Vermagen, but that was just an oral bit of information and probably mispronounced. I was also told they spoke Swabish (sp) or platt Deutsch (low German). The borders changed a lot and people had to change their names so they wouldn't get shot.



Thanks for all the info--I know you did a lot of work to find all of this.





...jan....

Friday, August 14, 2009

Friedrich Formazin

Things I have collected
First Marriage
Stephan Fermazin was my great great Grandfather Frederick Fermazin's son from first marriage to Louise Bonaau.
August Fermazin married Ernestine Kurz
Stephan Karl Fermazin
Caroline Fermazin
Henriette died from cholera 27 Sep 1852

Second Marriage was to Justine Braun
Children of second marriage were Charles Karl Fermazin my great grandfather
and Julia Augusta Fermazin

Third marriage to Caroline Hartwig who is the one who came to America
Children of third marriage were
Amelia Fermazin
Reinhart Fermazin
Bertha Fermazin

Friedrich Vormazin Formazin married Louise Bonau in on Dec.6,1840 in Labischin. He was single, age 21, and resided in Ruhden*, while Louise is also listed as single 24 years and 5 months. Of this marriage they had four children, August, Henriette, Stephan, and Caroline. Louise Bonau died from cholera in 1852 with one of their daughters, leaving behind three young children.
Friedrich Formazin remarried, also in Labischin:
On Jan.9,1853 Friedrich Formazin widower of Rynarzewo age 31, "Einwohner" got married to Justine Brauer, daughter of mailman of Arnoldowo age 25 years, 6 months,

We have quite a bit of information on August Vormazin Formazin. As for the name of Vormazin and Formazin, we seem to find Vormazin in the Labischin records but after the birth of August, Henriette, Stephan, and Caroline Vormazin, the last name changes from Vormazin to Formazin. Vormazin was probably the phonetic pronunciation of Formazin. My grandfather Robert August Fermazin was named after his uncle August Formazin.
August was born almost 9 months to the day, on 07 September 1841 in Florentowo, a parish of Schubin and lived most of his adult life in Labishin. He was baptized 12 September 1841. Witnesses to this baptism were Carl Meyer, August Reddmann, Renate Pinau (? Ristau) spelling), ((Ristau is related to Fermazin but have not made the connection yet) and Eva Meyer. Being the first born, to Friedrich Fermazin, Even though Formazin moved around much of August’s childhood, August did grow up to become a master tailor and settled in the town of Kwieciszewo.
Henriette was born on 9 October 1845 when they were living in Florentowo. She was baptized on 29 October 1849 and her godparents were Michael Fenske, Justine Reddmann, Christine Wegner, Anna Schmidt, and Justine Lurke. These must have been relatives, friends and/or neighbors to the Vormazin’s as some were the same sponsors for August’s christening. Henriette died at an early age, age 5 of cholera. However, from the birth records and baptism it appears Henriette may have not been the healthiest of children since she was not baptized until age 4.

We have quite a bit of information on August Vormazin Formazin. As for Vormazin and Formazin, we seem to find Vormazin in the Labischin records but after the birth of August, Henriette, Stephan, and Caroline Vormazin, the last name changes from Vormazin to Formazin. Vormazin was probably the phonetic pronunciation of Formazin. My grandfather Robert August Fermazin was named after his uncle August Formazin.

August Formazin son of Friedrich Formazin
August Formazin grew up and married Ernestine Kurz in 1865 at age 25. By this time August was working as a master tailor in the village of Jadownik. Later they moved on to Kwieciszewo. At the civil registration office of Gebice Land ( German Gembitz Land) the birth records October 1874-1895 and marriages and deaths 1895-1902 show that August Formazin and his spouse, Ernestine nee Kurz, must have bought a property there as records list him as landowner and master tailor. They settled there about 1877, since their older children were born there. August and Ernestine were happily married for 35 years. After Ernestine’s death August remarried Otilie Schmidt in 1900 and lived until 29 March 1921. We have only the death records of Ernestine and the marriage records of August Formazin and Otilie Schmidt but do not know if they had any children. August Vormazin died on 29 March 1921 at the age of 79years. in Kreis Mogilno in the village of Kwieciszewo

Children of August Formazin
Gustav Theophil, the first born was born 19 May 1866 in the village of Jadownik and died as an infant a few days later on 26 May 1866.
Anna Augusta Formazin’s birth in Kwieciszewo on 11 July 1867. Anna was named after her aunt Augusta (daughter of Friedrich Formazin and his second wife Justine Brauer) and her father August. Anna grew up and married Wilhelm Heinrich Koerner 21 June 1905 in Gembitz. Wilhelm Koerner was born 19 July 1880 in Hamelin, Hamelin County Germany. Witnesses for Anna and Wilhelm’s marriage were August Formazin age 62, her father, who was now living in Blutenau and Franz Hartel age 40 of Gembitz.
According to the civil registration Amalia Emma Formazin was born 8 July 1876 in Dombrowo Forsthaus district of Wongrowitz, and resided in Kwieciszewo. Amalia was named after her aunt Amelia Emily Formazin (daughter of Friedrich Formazin and his third wife, Caroline Hartwich) whom we will discuss later. Witnesses to the birth of Amalia Emma were Carl Busse age 45 of Kwieciszewo and master carpenter Arnold Gregor age 45 of Kwieciszewo. Amalia grew up in Kwieciszewo, and married Maxmillan Sobieszewski Strecker on 8 June 1898 in Kwieciszewo according to the records. Max was born on 9 August 1867 in the village of Strelno. Max’s birth name was Sobieszewski but later according to court records dated 30 January 1907 in the court (Postanowienie) House in Mogilno, Max and Amalia changed their last name to Strecker. For what reason we do not know. Max was the son of the deceased Fritz Sobieszewski of and Minna Nee Heyden of Strelno.
Helene Ernestine (named after her mother) was born 31 March 1879 and registered on 5 April 1879.
Wilhelmine Motilie was born 4 September 1880 and registered on 11 September 1880.
Friedrich Wilhelm was born 3 February 1882 named of course after grandpa Friedrich Formazin and his birth was registered on 7 February 1882.
Wilhelmine and Berte (I am pretty certain that Berte was the daughter of August Fermazin, just that we haven’t found her birth records yet) later traveled to America on the ship, Albano arriving in New York on 13 April 1896 to visit their grandfather, Friedrich and Uncle Stephan living in Chicago. According to the ship manifest and the records from the Ellis Island data base they had "two suitcases and were on there way to Chicago". I imagine this was exciting for two young women ages 21 and 16: the ship life, the other passengers, the excitement, the anticipation etc arriving at Ellis Island, New York city… Wonder if anyone was there to meet them?
After the death of Louise and Henriette, Friedrich later married Justine Brauer from Arnoldowo, Labischin, Posen, Prussia on 09 January 1853 in the Labischin Parish ("Einwohner" married Justine Braun, daughter of mailman of Arnoldowo age 25 years, 6 months Entry # 7/1853). After this entry we find no more Formazin’s living in Labischin so they must have moved out. Of this marriage we know of two children, Augusta and Karl (Charles). Julia Augusta was born 08 July 1857 and Karl was born November 1859
From: Correspondence email: Thomas Vogel July 28, 2003 to Nancy Fermazin
Now, let's start with the last place you were searching for.
Today it is called KWIECISZEWO. As you can see at www.pilot.pl it lies in the middle between Mogilno and Strzelno (Strelno in German). It probably was in the Kreis Mogilno and about 30-40 km South of Schubin, Bagno and Kanalskrug.

The age you give for Friedrich (* ca. 1824) is reasonable to think that the Stephan I found (*1847) is really his son. Possibly Friedrich married several times. It was not unusual for that time.
The thing that puzzles me a little bit is that Caroline came to America earlier than her husband. Normally the men traveled first and tried to earn money to pay for the passage of their family. I think he came in 1872, went back and then came again.
It is, however, quite clear that he stayed some time in the area around Bremen before leaving (Oldenburg was a town and the Grand-duchy West of Bremen http://www.genealogienetz.de/reg/ger1871.html).

Don't be surprised about age differences you find in US census recordings. I also had one uncle who emigrated in about 1900 and I read in his will that he considered himself to be 4 years younger than he actually was.
I guess, no one really cared about numbers. Only in cases where a certain age was required (military, marriage?) people certainly adjusted a little bit. Probably you may also be right with your assumption that the registrer might have estimated (parents probably know the age difference of their children - so this is mostly correct).
There is one correction I have to make:
Friedrich Vormazin (in 1847) was not "Schoenfaerber" - he was a "Einwohner" (inhabitant). That means that he was probably a farm labourer without land possession. These people are often found to have moved a lot. In contrast to farmers who where always bound to their land.
Reference: Correspondence email Thomas Vogel July 28, 2003 Posen List serv
LDS film #Kirchenbuchduplikat 1782-1862 Labischin (Kreis Schubin)


There were no more Formazins in Labischin parish up to 1862 when parish records end. Later, in the civil registry of Rynarzewo, I found no birth, marriage nor death records up to 1881. Thus, they moved out. We are still looking for the eight years from 1853 to 1862 for Friedrich Formazin. During this time he is married to Justine Braun and has two more children that we know of, Augusta and Karl. We assume that Justine had died around 1861 and the widower Friedrich remarried Carolina Hartwig (wich). Julia Augusta emigrated to the USA and sent for Karl who came later around 1872,
By the time Friedrich emigrates to the USA his name has changed from Vormazin, Formazin, and is now Fermazin and is married to Carolina Hartwig. Friedrich immigrated from Oldenburg in 1879, arriving in New York, December 12, 1879 with his daughter Emilie (Amelia) on the ship Ohio.
© Nancy Fermazin 2009 excerpts from Fermazin Family History

Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Roots - 8 Great-Great Grands

Roots 8 Great-Grands!

A few weeks ago, Randy Seaver of Randy's Saturday Night Genealogy Fun threw out a Saturday night genealogy challenge:

Do you have a pedigree chart that shows you as #1 and goes back five generations? If not, you should make one! Fire up your software program and create a report and save it (you'll see why in a minute!).

Here is your SNGF assignment for the evening (if you choose to accept it - this is not stump the genealogist or even Mission Impossible):

1.List your 16 great-great-grandparents in pedigree chart order. List their birth and death years and places.
2.Figure out the dominant ethnicity or nationality of each of them.
3.Calculate your ancestral ethnicity or nationality by adding them up for the 16 - 6.25% for each (obviously, this is approximate).
4.If you don't know all 16 of your great-great-grandparents, then do it for the last full generation you have.
5.Write your own blog post, or make a comment on Facebook or in this post.
Here's mine:
Well I don't have all the information on two of mine so I am posting my 8 great grandparents. This was a neat idea! Maybe someone will find me out there. I am going to post as much information on my 16 Great-Great-Grands as I have ....


EIGHT OF THE GREATS


These are my great grandparents… on a Wednesday morning:

1. Charles Daniel Fermazin was born on Nov 14, 1859 in Rynarzewo, Posen, Prussia and died on June 13, 1913 in Aurora, Illinois. On August 16, 1885 he married:

2. Wilhelmine Pluecker was born on June 6, 1868 in Aurora, Illinois and died Apr 17, 1952 in Aurora, Illinois.

3. Mathias Linden was born on March 27, 1854 in Waldbillig, Luxembourg and died on June 3, 1909 in Aurora, Illinois. On January 4, 1882 he married:

4. Catherina Pott (Pootz) was born on March 2, 1853 in Lipperscheid, Luxembourg and died on Feb 8 1917 in Aurora, Illinois.

5. Richard Seth Worthing was born on April 15, 1819 in Llananno, Radnorshire,Wales and died on December 18, 1907 in Truro, Madison, Iowa. On Oct 1, 1842 he married:

6. Sarah Ingram who was born on Nov 29, 1821 in Llwynbeddw Mill, Llannano Radnorshire Wales.

7. Ira Daniel Ames was born on July 4, 1842 in Liberty Township, Mc Kean, Pennsylvania and died on Sept 21, 1895 in Albion, Dane, Wisconsin. On June 25, 1868 he married:

8. Cornelia A. Palon was born on April 9, 1847 in Albion, Dane, Wisconsin and died on March 7, 1893 in Lake Koshkonong, Jefferson, Wisconsin.

50% Germanic Ancestry; 25% Welsh Ancestry; 25% possible Irish Ancestry;

Assignment from Randy Seaver, Genealogy Blogger.
Genea-Musings
http://www.geneamusings.com/

Genealogy research tips and techniques, genealogy news items and commentary, genealogy humor, San Diego genealogy society news, family history research and some family history stories from the keyboard of Randy Seaver (of Chula Vista CA), who thinks that Genealogy Research Is really FUN! Copyright (c) Randall J. Seaver, 2006-2009.
Saturday, August 8, 2009
Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Your 16 Great-Great-Grands
It's almost Saturday Night - time for some Genealogy Fun!

Do you have a pedigree chart that shows you as #1 and goes back five generations? If not, you should make one! Fire up your software program and create a report and save it (you'll see why in am inute!).


Genealogy today was 13.0 hours - 2 hours reading email and blogs, 4.5 hours writing blog posts, 3.0 hour researching on WVR since it's free for three days, Went to the Huntington Beach Library (Genealogy and computer sections) today for 3.5 hours to review films and check some books for information on NY state. Looking for Adolphus Ames in New York state is consuming a lot of time. I'm tired.
Cooked dinner for Bill and I. We had homemade chicken soup, green salad, and dessert was yogurt and fruit. Then watched my favorite TV show on DVR: CSI Miami.
It's been a long day and evening.

Roots - 16 Great-Great Grands

SIXTEEN OF THE GREAT-GREATS
These are my GREAT-Great grandparents…

1. Friedrich Fermazin was born in 1819 in Rynarzewo, Posen, Prussia and died about 1899 in Aurora,Kane, Illinois. I have not been able to find a record of his death. On Jan 9, 1853 he married:
2. Justine Bauer who was born in 1828 in Arnodowo, Labischin, Posen, Prussia and died in 1859 during childbirth. (I have not found the record of her death).
3. Bernhard Ludwig August Pluecker was born Aug 6, 1835 in Kohlgrund, Germany. He died Aug 3, 1912 in Aurora,Kane, Illinois. On Jan 27, 1864 he married:
4. Auguste Friederike Christian Herbold was born on May 10, 1835 in Herbsen, Germany and died on Jun 16, 1910 in Aurora,Kane, Illinois.
5. Theodore Dietrich Linden was born on Sept 8, 1808 in Waldbillig, Luxembourg. He died in 1880 in Aurora, Kane, Illinois.(I have not found the record of his death). On Sept 9, 1841 he married:
6. Maria Margaretha Wagoner was born Jan 24, 1816 in Berforf, Luxembourg. She died in 1869 in Waldbillig, Luxembourg.
7. Jean Pott (Pootz) was born Jan 16, 1819 in Gilsdorf, Luxembourg. He died Sept 28, 1858 in Flebour, Michelau, Luxembourg. On Oct 16, 1850 in Bourscheid, Luxembourg, he married:
8. Susanne Bevier was born about 1820 in Micheleu, Luxembourg. She died in 1857 in Micheleu, Luxembourg.
9. Richard Hamer was born in 1790 in Nantanel, Radnorshire, Wales. He is the father of my great grandfather Richard Worthing. He never married Mary Worthin. He bore a child with:
10. Mary Worthin who was born in 1791 in Nantenel, Radnorshire, Wales and died in Wales. (I have not found a record of her birth or death.
11. John Ingram was born circa 1790 in Llwynbeddw Mil, Llannano Radnorshire Wales. He died in 1880 in Birds Run,Guernsey, Ohio. (I have not found the death record). On Dec 17, 1813 he married:
12. Sarah Lewis was born about 1798 in Llwynbeddw Mill, Llananno, Radnorshire Wales. She died circa 1880 in Birds Run, Guernsey, Ohio. (I have not found her birth or death record).
13. Adolphus Ames was born in New York in 1809. He died April 18, 1854 in Albion, Dane, Wisconsin. In 1837 he married:
14. Sarah Julia {Unknown last name} was born in New York in 1812. She died in 1850 in Michigan migrating to Wisconsin.
15. Unknown Palon. Married:
16. Unknown but possibly Althea Palmer.

50% Germanic Ancestry; 25% Welsh Ancestry; 25% possible Irish Ancestry;Taken from Randy Seaver on his Geneamusings.com blog gave us all an assignment last week to post our 16 great-great grandparents.